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Montgomery Zoo's Bongo Herd is Growing

Zoo adds three new Bongo to their African hoofstock collection

Post Date:07/30/2019 11:22 AM

Montgomery Zoo Introduces Three New Bongo to its African Hoofstock Exhibit

The Montgomery Zoo and Mann Wildlife Learning Museum is excited to announce the addition of three new Bongo to the African hoofstock herd.  A female calf, Juni, born May 16, 2019 to Gertty, another adult female, Heidi and a juvenile male, Naveen.  Heidi and Naveen just arrived at the Montgomery Zoo from the Greater Richmond Zoo.  Juni is Gertty’s second calf and the second born at the Montgomery Zoo in two years.

The press and public are invited to join the Zoo in celebrating the debut of these new animals on Thursday, July 18, 2019, 10:00 a.m. at the African Realm observation deck between the Elephants and Cheetahs. Following Thursday’s introduction to the public the Bongos will be on display every other day depending on weather conditions and animal husbandry needs.

 About Bongos

Bongos (Tragelaphus eurycerus) are large, heavy-bodied antelope with short and glossy, orange or chestnut colored coats that is darker on the underside and patterned with vertical white stripes are found inhabiting the dense forests of Eastern, Western and Central Africa. They are the largest forest-dwelling antelope species and one of the most distinctive, with long horns that spiral as high as 35 inches in males. Bongos are herbivorous mammals, meaning they only feed on plants roots, bark and grasses and generally eat under the cover of night to keep them safe from predators. Although they tend to be most active between dusk and dawn, Bongos are known to occasionally browse during the day but will never leave the dense vegetation that surrounds them. To help them to cool down in the heat, Bongos wallow in mud which they then rub onto a tree as a way of polishing their smooth and heavy horns.

 

 

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